Fan Zhang

Associate Professor - Physics
 
972-883-3509
SCI 3.186
Quantum Condensed Matter Theory
ORCID
Tags: Physics

Professional Preparation

Postdoc - Physics
University of Pennsylvania - 2014
Ph.D. - Physics
University of Texas at Austin - 2011
B.S. - Physics
University of Science and Technology of China - 2006

Publications

Moire Band Topology in Twisted Bilayer Graphene - Other
Quantum anomalous Hall octet driven by orbital magnetism in bilayer graphene 2021 - Journal Article
Higher-Order Dirac Sonic Crystals 2021 - Journal Article
Room-Temperature Topological Phase Transition in Quasi-One-Dimensional Material Bi4I4 2021 - Journal Article
Acoustic Möbius insulators from projective symmetry 2021 - Other
Higher-order Dirac sonic crystals 2020 - Other
Line up for high-temperature Majoranas 2020 - Journal Article
Hole-doped room-temperature superconductivity in H3S1-xZ (Z=C, Si) 2020 - Journal Article
Zero-bias conductance peak in Dirac semimetal-superconductor devices 2020 - Journal Article
Author Correction: Unconventional valley-dependent optical selection rules and landau level mixing in bilayer graphene 2020 - Journal Article

Awards

CAREER Award - NSF [2020]

News Articles

Physicists Discover Novel Quantum Effect in Bilayer Graphene
Theorists at The University of Texas at Dallas, along with colleagues in Germany, have for the first time observed a rare phenomenon called the quantum anomalous Hall effect in a very simple material. Previous experiments have detected it only in complex or delicate materials.

Dr. Fan Zhang, associate professor of physics in the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, is an author of a study published on Oct. 6 in the journal Nature that demonstrates the exotic behavior in bilayer graphene, which is a naturally occurring, two-atom thin layer of carbon atoms arranged in two honeycomb lattices stacked together.
High-Quality Crystals Reveal New Physics of Topological Insulators
Combining exceptional crystal-growing skills with theoretical predictions, the University of Texas at Dallas scientists and their collaborators have revealed new insights into materials called topological insulators.

Topological insulators (TIs) behave like insulators in their interiors but are conductors on their exteriors. There are distinctive families of topological insulators: strong TIs, which are common in nature; weak TIs, which are rare and difficult to produce in the lab; and another rare class called higher-order TIs.

 In a cube-shaped, strong topological insulator, for example, all six faces can conduct electrons robustly. In a weak TI, only four sides are conducting, while the top and bottom surfaces remain insulating. In a higher-order TI, electrons move only along selected hinges, where two crystal faces intersect. 
Scientist To Delve Deep into Quantum Physics with NSF CAREER Award
Dr. Fan Zhang, associate professor of physics in the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at The University of Texas at Dallas, has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) award for his research in the complex realm of quantum physics.

The five-year grant will support Zhang’s theoretical work and education outreach on the fundamental physics of topological superconductivity.

Zhang’s research builds on the science of topological insulators, which are materials that behave like insulators in their interiors but are conductors on their exteriors. His NSF project involves investigating the topological properties of superconductors — materials in which, below a certain critical temperature, electrical resistance vanishes and magnetic fields are expelled.
Physicists Find Misaligned Carbon Sheets Yield Unparalleled Properties
A material composed of two one-atom-thick layers of carbon has grabbed the attention of physicists worldwide for its intriguing — and potentially exploitable — conductive properties.

Dr. Fan Zhang, assistant professor of physics in the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at The University of Texas at Dallas, and physics doctoral student Qiyue Wang published an article in June with Dr. Fengnian Xia’s group at Yale University in Nature Photonics that describes how the ability of twisted bilayer graphene to conduct electrical current changes in response to mid-infrared light.
University Physicists Demonstrate Negative Refraction Without Reflection
Physicists at The University of Texas at Dallas and Wuhan University have created an artificial structure that does not reflect sound and bends it in a way that does not occur in nature.
The results could inspire new directions in wave manipulation, such as acoustic cloaking technologies, and advances in photonics and electronics, said Dr. Fan Zhang, assistant professor of physics at UT Dallas and one of the authors of the study published in Nature.