Dohyeong Kim

Associate Dean of Graduate Education
Associate Professor of Public Policy and Political Economy, Geospatial Information Sciences
Director of Geospatial Health Research Group
Tags: Geospatial Information Science Social Data Analytics and Research Public Policy Political Economy Global Health

Professional Preparation

Ph.D - City and Regional Planning (Health Planning)
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - 2007
M.A - Public Administration
Yonsei University, Seoul - 1999
B.A - Public Administration
Yonsei University, Seoul - 1996

Research Areas

Global Health and Safety
Geospatial Health and Public Policy
Environmental Health and Disaster Planning
Spatiotemporal Big Data Analysis and Machine Learning

Publications

Five Year Trends of Particulate Matter Concentrations in Korean Regions (2015–2019): When to Ventilate? 2020 - Journal Article
Real-Time Measurement of Indoor PM Concentrations on Daily Change of Endocrine Disruptors in Urine Samples of New Mothers 2020 - Journal Article
Analyzing the Role of Resource Factors in Citizens’ Intention to Pay for and Participate in Disaster Management 2020 - Journal Article
A Closer Look at the Bivariate Association between Ambient Air Pollution and Allergic Diseases: The Role of Spatial Analysis 2018 - Journal Article
A Meta-Regression Analysis of the Effectiveness of Mosquito Nets for Malaria Control: The Value of Long-Lasting Insecticide Nets 2018 - Journal Article

Appointments

Assistant to Associate Professor
North Carolina Central University [2008–2013]
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Duke University [2005–2008]
Research and Teaching Assistant
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill [2000–2005]

Awards

Teaching Award for Distinguished Graduate Teaching - UT Dallas School of EPPS [2020]
Outstanding Teaching Comet Award - University of Texas at Dallas [2014]
Award of Appreciation - NCCU MPA Class of 2013 [2013]
Research Fellow - Institute for Poverty Alleviation and International Development [2011]
New Investigators in Global Health (NIGH) Award - Global Health Council [2008]
Superior Graduate Student Award - SBS Seo-Am Academic Foundation [1998]

News Articles

Researcher Investigates Preparedness for New Disease Outbreaks in South Korea
The availability of adequate health care facilities is one of the most important factors that public-health policymakers grapple with when preparing for infectious disease outbreaks such as COVID-19.

And one of the most critical resources for controlling infectious respiratory diseases is the negative-pressure isolation room (NPIR). In a new study published online July 8 and in the November print issue of the International Journal of Health Policy and Management, a researcher from The University of Texas at Dallas investigated the allocation process and spatial distribution of NPIRs in South Korea during past outbreaks.

Dr. Dohyeong Kim, associate professor of public policy and political economy and of geospatial information sciences in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, is one of the study’s co-authors. The researchers used historical data to evaluate whether South Korea is prepared for future outbreaks.
Crowdsourced Data Could Help Map Urban Food Deserts
New research from The University of Texas at Dallas suggests food deserts might be more prevalent in the U.S. than the numbers reported in government estimates.

In a feasibility study published in the journal Frontiers in Public Health, scholars found that the methods used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to identify areas with low access to healthy food are often outdated and narrow in scope.

Their findings indicate that crowdsourced information gathered from mobile apps such as Yelp could help provide more accurate real-time representation of food deserts in impoverished communities.

“Using data from the city of Dallas, we compared our results with the 2015 USDA database and discovered the agency needs an up-to-date source of information on grocery stores,” said Dr. Dohyeong Kim, associate professor of public policy and political economy and of geospatial information sciences in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences at UT Dallas. “The number of food deserts may be a lot larger than what the USDA says it is.”
Dr. Kim received the UT Dallas EPPS Teaching Award for Distinguished Graduate Teaching
Old Mobile Phone Technology May Help Curb Traffic Deaths in Nigeria
Researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas and UT Southwestern Medical Center are investigating new ways to use old mobile phone technology to help first responders in developing countries reduce the time it takes to transport traffic accident victims to hospitals.

Part of the research involves using data collection methods to identify areas of large cities that are prone to traffic-related injuries but lack information to allocate limited resources optimally.
“We are assisting in the area of injury research,” said Dr. Dohyeong Kim, associate professor of public policy and political economy and of geospatial information sciences in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences at UT Dallas. “We want to use traditional cellphone technology in wide use in these countries to provide more accurate accident location information to first responders.”

Kim and Dr. Fiemu Nwariaku, professor of surgery and associate dean of global health at UT Southwestern, are co-principal investigators on a $427,000, two-year grant from the National Institutes of Health’s Fogarty International Center (grant R21TW010991) to promote health across the globe. Kim and Nwariaku will spend the next two years developing ways to leverage existing, low-cost mobile phone technology in Lagos, Nigeria, to help roadway accident victims.

Study Ties Fire Station Proximity Firmly to Prevention of Injuries
Does living closer to a fire station equate to a higher level of safety? It’s a commonly held belief, and now Dr. Dohyeong Kim at The University of Texas at Dallas has gathered empirical evidence that does indeed support that assertion.

“It was unclear if location characteristics relating to the accessibility of fire protection services were risk factors for unintentional residential fire-related injuries in urban areas,” said Kim, an associate professor of public policy and political economy in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences. “Our study aimed to measure spatial accessibility to fire protection services at the census block group level and to examine whether it is associated with unintentional residential fire-related injuries.”

Affiliations

Chair
2020/06–2022/05
ASPA Section on Korean Public Administration, American Society for Public Administration

Funding

Reducing the Burden of Road Traffic-Associated Mortality using Mobile Technology
USD 142,816 - U.S. National Institute of Health (R21TW010991) [2019/07–2021/07]
Comparative Geospatial Analysis of Injury Burden in Low and Middle Income Countries
USD 6,880 - University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center [2017/06–2018/06]
Exploring Determinants for Recruitment and Retention of Family Doctors for Rural Practice in Vietnam: Lessons from a Discrete Choice Experiment
USD 5,000 - Haiphong University of Medicine and Pharmacy [2016/05–2016/08]
Experiencing Dallas as a Future City: Technology, Culture and Governance
USD 16,031 - Incheon National University International Internship Program Grant [2015/01–2015/03]
Center for Geospatial Research in Global Health Policy: Developing a Spatial Data and Research Hub for the Global Health Communities
USD 5,000 - EPPS Advisory Council Grants [2015/01–2015/12]