Dohyeong Kim

Dohyeong Kim

Associate Dean of Graduate Education
Professor of Public Policy, Geospatial Information Sciences & Social Data Analytics and Reseach
Director of Geospatial Health Research Group
Tags: Geospatial Information Science Social Data Analytics and Research Public Policy Political Economy Global Health Big Data Analytics Environment and Sustainability Emergency Management and Safety

Professional Preparation

Ph.D - City and Regional Planning (Health Planning)
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - 2007
M.A - Public Administration
Yonsei University, Seoul - 1999
B.A - Public Administration
Yonsei University, Seoul - 1996

Research Areas

Global Health and Safety
Geospatial Health and Public Policy
Environmental Health and Disaster Planning
Spatiotemporal Big Data Analysis and Machine Learning

Publications

Regional Disparity in the Educational Impact of COVID-19: A Spatial Difference-in-Difference Approach 2023 - Journal Article
Identifying Hot Spots of Tuberculosis in Nigeria Using an Early Warning Outbreak Recognition System: Retrospective Analysis of Implications for Active Case Finding Interventions 2023 - Journal Article
Support for regulation versus compliance: Face masks during COVID-19 2023 - Journal Article
Understanding Habitats and Environmental Conditions of White-Tailed Deer Population Density and Public Health Data to Aid in Assessing Human Tick-Borne Disease Risk 2023 - Journal Article
Improving Surveillance of Human Tick-Borne Disease Risks: Spatial Analysis Using Multimodal Databases 2023 - Journal Article
Spatial modeling for radon concentrations in subway stations in Seoul, Korea 2022 - Journal Article
Ambient PM Concentrations as a Precursor of Emergency Visits for Respiratory Complaints: Roles of Deep Learning and Multi-Point Real-Time Monitoring 2022 - Journal Article
Improving Surveillance of Human Tick-Borne Disease Risks: Spatial Analysis Using Multimodal Databases (Preprint) 2022 - Other

Awards

President's Teaching Excellence Award - UT Dallas [2023]
Best Article Award - Asian Association of Crisisonomy [2022]
Teaching Award for Distinguished Graduate Teaching - UT Dallas School of EPPS [2020]
Award of Appreciation - UTD Korean Student Association [2018]
Outstanding Teaching Comet Award - University of Texas at Dallas [2014]
Award of Appreciation - NCCU MPA Class of 2013 [2013]
Research Fellow - Institute for Poverty Alleviation and International Development [2011]
New Investigators in Global Health (NIGH) Award - Global Health Council [2008]
Superior Graduate Student Award - SBS Seo-Am Academic Foundation [1998]

Appointments

Assistant to Associate Professor
North Carolina Central University [2008–2013]
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Duke University [2005–2008]
Research and Teaching Assistant
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill [2000–2005]

News Articles

Innovative Educators Earn President’s Teaching Excellence Awards
Innovative Educators Earn President’s Teaching Excellence Awards Dr. Dohyeong Kim, professor of public policy, geospatial information sciences, and social data analytics and research

What was the best part of your teaching experience this year?
Witnessing my students’ growth and success. It brings me immense satisfaction to see a struggling student finally grasp a concept, observe a group of students work collaboratively toward a shared objective, and witness their overall progress and achievement.

What’s your advice for someone who wants to improve their online teaching abilities?
Keep your students engaged in dynamic class activities. Incorporating interactive and multimedia tools, such as videos, quizzes and online discussion forums, can be beneficial in maintaining students’ attention and interest. Create opportunities for students to share their thoughts and ideas in a virtual space. Furthermore, it is vital to remain adaptable to meet the needs of your students, especially those who may be new to online learning.

What is one of your favorite memories from teaching at UT Dallas?
Regardless of whether I am instructing a graduate or an undergraduate class, I always inspire my students to aim higher than simply achieving an A grade. Witnessing my students’ growth, both personally and professionally, is an unforgettable experience that I hold dear to my heart.

Researchers Use Geospatial Mapping To Assist Burn Patients
Researchers Use Geospatial Mapping To Assist Burn Patients University of Texas at Dallas researchers are using geospatial mapping techniques to identify social and environmental obstacles in communities that might impede burn injury survivors’ reentry into society.

The project is designed to help patients with burn injuries better adapt to their lives after medical discharge, including improving patient access to transportation, employment, food and other necessities.

Scotch and Dr. Dohyeong Kim, professor of public policy, geospatial information sciences (GIS), and social data analytics and research, are working on the project with researchers affiliated with the North Texas Burn Rehabilitation Model System, a joint program of UT Southwestern Medical Center and Parkland Health & Hospital System that is funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), which is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The UTD and UT Southwestern researchers received a five-year, nearly $250,000 grant for their geospatial mapping project from the NIDILRR.
Life Beyond the Pandemic
Life Beyond the Pandemic You are in for a fascinating conversation in the latest episode of “What To Know.” Two years after the COVID-19 pandemic began in the United States, and as the Omicron wave wanes, experts examine what the world will look like post-pandemic and how our lives will be forever changed. Dr. Warner moderates the episode, featuring medical anthropologist Carolyn Smith-Morris, Ph.D., M.S., LPC, of Southern Methodist University and Dohyeong Kim, Ph.D., a social scientist at UT Dallas.
Researcher Investigates Preparedness for New Disease Outbreaks in South Korea
Researcher Investigates Preparedness for New Disease Outbreaks in South Korea The availability of adequate health care facilities is one of the most important factors that public-health policymakers grapple with when preparing for infectious disease outbreaks such as COVID-19.

And one of the most critical resources for controlling infectious respiratory diseases is the negative-pressure isolation room (NPIR). In a new study published online July 8 and in the November print issue of the International Journal of Health Policy and Management, a researcher from The University of Texas at Dallas investigated the allocation process and spatial distribution of NPIRs in South Korea during past outbreaks.

Dr. Dohyeong Kim, associate professor of public policy and political economy and of geospatial information sciences in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, is one of the study’s co-authors. The researchers used historical data to evaluate whether South Korea is prepared for future outbreaks.
Crowdsourced Data Could Help Map Urban Food Deserts
Crowdsourced Data Could Help Map Urban Food Deserts New research from The University of Texas at Dallas suggests food deserts might be more prevalent in the U.S. than the numbers reported in government estimates.

In a feasibility study published in the journal Frontiers in Public Health, scholars found that the methods used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to identify areas with low access to healthy food are often outdated and narrow in scope.

Their findings indicate that crowdsourced information gathered from mobile apps such as Yelp could help provide more accurate real-time representation of food deserts in impoverished communities.

“Using data from the city of Dallas, we compared our results with the 2015 USDA database and discovered the agency needs an up-to-date source of information on grocery stores,” said Dr. Dohyeong Kim, associate professor of public policy and political economy and of geospatial information sciences in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences at UT Dallas. “The number of food deserts may be a lot larger than what the USDA says it is.”

Affiliations

Advisory Board Member
2023/04
DK Foundation
Vice President
2023/01
Korean Association of Disastronomy
Chairperson, International Affairs Committee
2023/01–2023/12
The Korean Association for Policy Studies
Member of National Election Commission Overseas Voting
2022/01–2022/12
Republic of Korea
Chair
2020/06–2022/05
ASPA Section on Korean Public Administration, American Society for Public Administration

Funding

Geospatial Community Mapping to Assess Social and Environmental Barriers and Facilitators for Burn Survivors
USD 249,527 - National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research [2022/09–2027/08]
Reducing the Burden of Road Traffic-Associated Mortality using Mobile Technology
USD 142,816 - U.S. National Institute of Health (R21TW010991) [2019/07–2021/07]
Comparative Geospatial Analysis of Injury Burden in Low and Middle Income Countries
USD 6,880 - University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center [2017/06–2018/06]
Exploring Determinants for Recruitment and Retention of Family Doctors for Rural Practice in Vietnam: Lessons from a Discrete Choice Experiment
USD 5,000 - Haiphong University of Medicine and Pharmacy [2016/05–2016/08]
Experiencing Dallas as a Future City: Technology, Culture and Governance
USD 16,031 - Incheon National University International Internship Program Grant [2015/01–2015/03]