Tomislav Kovandzic

Associate Professor of Criminology
Tags: Criminology & Criminal Justice

Professional Preparation

Ph.D. - Criminology and Criminal Justice
Florida State University - 1999
M.S. - Criminology and Criminal Justice
Florida State University - 1995
B.A. - Criminology and Criminal Justice
Florida State University - 1993

Research Areas

Works in Progress
  • Kleck, Gary, Tomislav V. Kovandzic, and Mark Saber. "Fear of Crime, Prior Victimization and Prospective Gun Ownership."
  • Morris, Robert G., Lynne M. Vieraitis, and Tomislav Kovandzic. "Crack, Guns, and the Killing of Young Black Males: A Test of the Blumstein Thesis."
  • Kovandzic, Tomislav V., Mark Schaffer, and Gary Kleck. "Estimating the Causal Effects of Gun Prevalence on Homicide Rates."
  • Kleck, Gary, Tomislav V. Kovandzic, and Jon Bellows. "The Impact of Gun Laws and Gun Levels on Crime Rates."
  • Kovandzic, Tomislav V., Gary Kleck, Mark Schaffer, and Thomas Marvell. "The Impact of the Brady Law on Homicide."
  • Orrick, Erin A. and Tomislav V. Kovandzic. "Are Illegal Mexican Immigrants Really More Likely to Commit Homicide?"
Research Interests
  • Gun Control and Gun Violence
  • Death Penalty
  • Deterrence and Incapacitation
  • Criminal Justice Policy
  • Structural Correlates of Crime

Publications

2005. Kovandzic, Tomislav V., Thomas B. Marvell, and Lynne, M. Vieraitis. Right-to-Carry Concealed Handguns and Homicide: Evidence from City Panel Data. Homicide Studies 9:292-323. 2005 - Publication
2004. Kovandzic, Tomislav V., Thomas Marvell, Lynne, M. Vieraitis, and Carlisle E. Moody. When Prisoners Get Out: The Impact of Prison Releases on Homicide Rates, 1975-1999. Criminal Justice Policy Review 15:212-228. 2004 - Publication
2004. Lyman, Jackie M., Gerald McGwin, Gregory Davis, Tomislav V. Kovandzic, William King, and Sten H. Vermund. A comparison of three sources of data on child homicide. Death Studies 28:659-69. 2004 - Publication
2004. Kovandzic, Tomislav V., John J. Sloan, and Lynne M. Vieraitis. Unintended Consequences of Politically Popular Sentencing Policy: The Homicide Promoting Effects of 'Three Strikes' in US Cities (1980-1999). Pp. 456-470 in George F. Cole, Marc C. Gertz and Amy Bunger (Eds.), The Criminal Justice System: Politics and Policies. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth 2004 - Publication
2004. Kovandzic, Tomislav V., John J. Sloan, and Lynne M. Vieraitis. Striking Out as Crime Reduction Policy: The Impact of Three Strikes Laws on Crime Rates in U.S. Cities. Justice Quarterly 21:1-24. 2004 - Publication
2003. Kovandzic, Tomislav V., and Thomas B. Marvell. Right-To-Carry Concealed Firearms and Violent Crime: Crime Control Through Gun Decontrol? Criminology and Public Policy 2:363-396. 2003 - Publication
2002. Kovandzic, Tomislav V., and John J. Sloan. 2002. Police Levels and Crime Rates Revisited: A County-Level Analysis from Florida (1980-1998). Journal of Criminal Justice 30:65-76. 2002 - Publication
2002. Duwe, Grant, Tomislav V. Kovandzic, and Carlisle E. Moody. The Impact of Right-To-Carry Concealed Firearm Laws on Mass Public Shootings. Homicide Studies 6:271-296. 2002 - Publication
2002. Kovandzic, Tomislav V., John J. Sloan and Lynne M. Vieraitis. Unintended Consequences of Politically Popular Sentencing Policy: The Homicide Promoting Effects of Three Strikes in U.S. Cities (1980-1999). Criminology and Public Policy 1:399-424. 2002 - Publication
2001. Kovandzic, Tomislav V. The Impact of Florida's Habitual Offender Law on Crime. Criminology 39:179-204. 2001 - Publication

Appointments

Associate Professor
University of Texas at Dallas [2007–Present]
Associate Professor
University of Alabama at Birmingham [2005–2007]
Assistant Professor
University of Alabama at Birmingham [1998–2005]
Research Assistant
Florida State University [1997–1998]

Projects

firearm-related injuries and the methodology for studying such forms of violence
2003–2003 2003. Invited guest lecturer on firearm-related injuries and the methodology for studying such forms of violence. University of Alabama at Birmingham, Ryals School of Public Health. Department of Epidemiology and International Health. EPI 790: Doctoral Seminar in Epidemiology. December 4, 2003
Instrumenting Police Levels with Federal Law Enforcement Spending: An Assessment of Recent Efforts
2007–2007 2007. (with John L. Worrall) Instrumenting Police Levels with Federal Law Enforcement Spending: An Assessment of Recent Efforts. Presented at the 3rd Annual Crime and Population Dynamics Summer Workshop, Queenstown, Maryland, June 2007.
The Effect of Gun Levels on Violence Rates Depends on Whhas Them
2003–2003 (with Gary Kleck) The Effect of Gun Levels on Violence Rates Depends on Whhas Them. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology in Denver, Colorado, November, 2003.
Gun Prevalence, Homicide Rates, and Causality: A GMM Approach tEndogeneity Bias
2005–2005 2005. (with Mark Schaffer and Gary Kleck) Gun Prevalence, Homicide Rates, and Causality: A GMM Approach tEndogeneity Bias. Presented at the University of Strathclyde Department of Economics seminar, December 2005.
The Impact of Florida's Prison Population Growth on Crime Rates: A Multiple Time Series Analysis: The Florida Experience
2000–2000 (with M.R. Bodapati) The Impact of Florida's Prison Population Growth on Crime Rates: A Multiple Time Series Analysis: The Florida Experience. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology in San Francisco, California, November, 2000.

Additional Information

Departmental activities and committees
  • Criminology Program Development Committee, 2007-2008
  • Comprehensive Grading Committee, 2008 to current
School activities and committees
  • Committee Member, Teaching Effectiveness Committee, 2007 to current
  • Committee Member, EPPS Statistical Methodology Revision Committee 2008
University activities and committees
  • Committee Member, Intellectual Property Committee, 2008-2009

News Articles

Study: Recent Spikes in Homicide Rates Don't Tell Whole Story
Recent spikes in homicide rates across the nation have been attributed to causes ranging from civil unrest to the opioid epidemic, but new UT Dallas research published in the journal Homicide Studies found a much simpler explanation: The increases follow predictable fluctuations in rates over the past 55 years.

“If you look at the trends over time, you can often see ups and downs of that magnitude,” said Dr. Andrew Wheeler, assistant professor of criminology in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences.

The fact that homicide rates in most cities remain relatively stable, but with minor fluctuations from year-to-year suggests that long-term factors such as segregation and/or concentrated poverty play a more important role in the increases, said Dr. Tomislav V. Kovandzic, associate professor of criminology and co-author of the study.

Funding

Research Partner for Project Safe Neighborhoods: Northern District of Alabama
$150,000 - Bureau of Justice Assistance [2002–2002]