Jason Slinker

Physics Undergraduate Program Head
Associate Professor - Physics
Mentor, Society of Physics Students
Tags: Physics

Professional Preparation

Ph.D. - Applied and Engineering Physics
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) - 2007
M.S. - Applied and Engineering Physics
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) - 2006
B.S. - Physics, Chemistry and Math (Triple major, GPA: 4.0)
Southern Nazarene University - 2001

Research Areas

Bioinspired Molecular Wires from Perylene Diimides
Utilizing perylene diimides and DNA bioconjugate chemistry to fabricate molecular nanowire devices with high fidelity and reproducibility.
Electrochemical Sensors of Protein and Drug Activity
Electrochemical DNA devices are used to sense anticancer drug and protein activity that disrupts the structure of the double helix.
Optoelectronics from Organic and Hybrid Mixed Conductors
Ionic and electronic conductivity are leveraged to bring about high efficiency light emitting devices and solar cells with simple, low-cost architectures.

Publications

Enhanced Operational Stability of Perovskite Light‐Emitting Electrochemical Cells Leveraging Ionic Additives 2020 - Journal Article
Circumventing Dedicated Electrolytes in Light‐Emitting Electrochemical Cells 2020 - Journal Article
Bright and Effectual Perovskite Light Emitting Electrochemical Cells Leveraging Ionic Additives 2019 - Journal Article
Electrical characterization of ZnO-coated nanospring ensemble by impedance spectroscopy: probing the effect of thermal annealing 2019 - Journal Article
Enhancement of the Electrical Properties of DNA Molecular Wires through Incorporation of Perylenediimide DNA Base Surrogates 2019 - Journal Article
Luminescent properties of a 3,5-diphenylpyrazole bridged Pt(ii) dimer 2019 - Journal Article
Application of Electrochemical Devices to Characterize the Dynamic Actions of Helicases on DNA 2018 - Journal Article
Following anticancer drug activity in cell lysates with DNA devices 2018 - Journal Article
Ionic Organic Small Molecules as Hosts for Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells 2018 - Journal Article
The Effect of the Dielectric Constant and Ion Mobility in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells 2018 - Journal Article

Appointments

Associate Professor
The University of Texas at Dallas [2016–Present]
Physics Undergraduate Program Head; Affilated Faculty, Materials Science and Engineering; Mentor, UTD Society of Physics Students; Research Topic: Electrochemical optoelectronics and bioinspired electronics; 2020 International Advisory Boa;rd, ChemPlusChem; 2019 Texas Section American Physical Society Hyer Award (with Nolan King)
Assistant Professor
The University of Texas at Dallas [2010–2016]
-2014 University of Texas System Regent's Outstanding Teacher Award -2014 Texas Section American Physical Society Hyer Award (with Marc McWilliams)
Postdoctoral Scholar
California Institute of Technology [2007–2010]
Advisor: Jackie K. Barton Electrochemical protein detection with DNA-modified electrodes Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) postdoctoral fellowship
Graduate Research Assistant
Cornell University [2002–2007]
Advisor: George G. Malliaras Understanding and improving light emitting devices based on ionic transition metal complexes (iTMCs) National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship
Visiting Scientist
University of Cambridge (England) [2005–2005]
Advisor: Richard H. Friend Used Raman spectroscopy to study the degradation of iTMC devices by tracking the in situ formation and spatial location of luminescence-quenching compounds.

Awards

Hyer Award - American Physical Society, Texas Section [2019]
Institutional Improvement Award - The University of Texas at Dallas [2018]
Hyer Award - American Physical Society, Texas Section [2014]
Regent's Outstanding Teaching Award - University of Texas System [2014]
Outstanding Alumni Award - Southern Nazarene University [2013]

Additional Information

Patents

Cascaded light emitting devices based on mixed conductor electroluminescence. G. G. Malliaras, K. Mori, J. D. Slinker, D. A. Bernards and H. D. Abruña. US Patent No. 7,755,275 (2010).

Cascaded light emitting devices based on mixed conductor electroluminescence. G. G. Malliaras, K. Mori, J. D. Slinker, D. A. Bernards and H. D. Abruña.  US Patent No. 8,063,566 (2011).

Electrospun light-emitting nanofibers. J. Moran-Mirabal, H. G. Craighead, G. G. Malliaras, H. D. Abruña and J. D. Slinker. US Patent No. 8,106,580 (2012).

Electrospun light-emitting fibers. J. Moran-Mirabal, H. G. Craighead, G. G. Malliaras, H. D. Abruña and J. D. Slinker. US Patent No. 8,541,940 (2013).

(Pending) High Performance Light Emitting Devices from Ionic Transition Metal Complexes. J. D. Slinker, Y. Shen and B. H. Holliday. US Patent Application No. 20140291590.

News Articles

Perovskite Light‐Emitting Electrochemical Cells: Enhanced Operational Stability of Perovskite Light‐Emitting Electrochemical Cells Leveraging Ionic Additives
Perovskite light‐emitting electrochemical cells (PeLECs) utilize ionic redistribution to emit light efficiently from single layer devices. As demonstrated by Jason D. Slinker and co‐workers in article number 2000226, PeLECs show 100 h operation in excess of 800 cd m−2 and extrapolated lifetimes of 6700 h at 100 cd m−2 with an optimal concentration of a lithium salt additive. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals lithium additives enhance efficiency through improved electrical double layer formation.
Bright and Effectual Perovskite Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells Leveraging Ionic Additives
We leveraged a poly(ethylene oxide) electrolyte and a lithium salt in CsPbBr3 thin films to produce ~15000 cd/m2 performance in perovskite light-emitting electrochemical cells. We find that lithium salt addition reduces the occurrence of voids, charge traps, and pinholes and increases grain size and packing density. View the article.
Electrical Wires Made from DNA
The team fabricated arrays of nanoscale electrodes and bridged them with the DNA wires to produce two types of single-molecular devices (pictured). By performing current-voltage measurements for these devices, the researchers found that the incorporation of PTCDI within the DNA molecular wires led to an approximately six‐fold enhancement in the observed current levels. The team attributes this effect to the improved charge transport through the PTCDI groups compared with the natural two A−T base pairs found at the site.
DNA Devices For Selective, Individualized Cancer Therapy
Given the emerging landscape of DNA damaging drugs, it would be highly beneficial to develop sensors that can follow drug activity to discover patient-specific responses. To address this challenge, we propose to leverage a device to investigate the activity of drugs from patient samples to identify optimal treatments. In our work with the Boothman Lab of the Indiana University School of Medicine, we demonstrated a means to follow DNA damage responses to anticancer drug treatment in lysates of cancerous and normal cells.
Effect of the Dielectric Constant and Ion Mobility in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells
A cationic iridium complex emitter in a light-emitting electrochemical cell is used to study the competing effects on the dielectric constant by varying the size of the negative ions with it.

Funding

High Precision Electrical Characterization of Bioinspired Nanowire Devices
$122,384 - Office of Naval Research [2020/02–2021/01]
Leveraging a Solvent Toolkit for Doping and Characterizing Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells
200,000 - National Science Foundation [2019/06–2022/05]
DNA-INSPIRED ASSEMBLY OF NANOSCALE ELECTRONIC DEVICES
$180,000 - Office of Naval Research [2016/08–2020/07]
REU Site: Summer Research Program in Experimental and Theoretical Physics at The University of Texas at Dallas
$268,000 - National Science Foundation [2016/01–2020/12]
SNM: DNA-Directed Self Assembly of Nanoscale Integrated Circuits
$300,000 - National Science Foundation [2012/01–2015/06]