Jason Slinker

Physics Undergraduate Program Head
Associate Professor - Physics
Mentor, Society of Physics Students
slinker@utdallas.edu
972-883-6513
PHY 1.902
Slinker Group
ORCID
Tags: Physics

Professional Preparation

Ph.D. - Applied and Engineering Physics
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) - 2007
M.S. - Applied and Engineering Physics
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) - 2006
B.S. - Physics, Chemistry and Math (Triple major, GPA: 4.0)
Southern Nazarene University - 2001

Research Areas

Bioinspired Molecular Wires from Perylene Diimides
Utilizing perylene diimides and DNA bioconjugate chemistry to fabricate molecular nanowire devices with high fidelity and reproducibility.
Electrochemical Sensors of Protein and Drug Activity
Electrochemical DNA devices are used to sense anticancer drug and protein activity that disrupts the structure of the double helix.
Optoelectronics from Organic and Hybrid Mixed Conductors
Ionic and electronic conductivity are leveraged to bring about high efficiency light emitting devices and solar cells with simple, low-cost architectures.

Publications

Application of Electrochemical Devices to Characterize the Dynamic Actions of Helicases on DNA 2018 - Journal Article
Following anticancer drug activity in cell lysates with DNA devices 2018 - Journal Article
Ionic Organic Small Molecules as Hosts for Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells 2018 - Journal Article
The Effect of the Dielectric Constant and Ion Mobility in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells 2018 - Journal Article
Solvent Toolkit for Electrochemical Characterization of Hybrid Perovskite Films 2017 - Journal Article
The Use of Additives in Ionic Transition Metal Complex Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells 2017 - Book Chapter
Understanding the superior temperature stability of iridium light-emitting electrochemical cells 2017 - Journal Article
Discerning the Impact of a Lithium Salt Additive in Thin-Film Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy 2016 - Journal Article
Enhanced Luminance of Electrochemical Cells with a Rationally Designed Ionic Iridium Complex and an Ionic Additive 2016 - Journal Article
Influence of Lithium Additives in Small Molecule Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells 2016 - Journal Article

Appointments

Associate Professor
The University of Texas at Dallas [2016–Present]
Physics Undergraduate Program Head & Mentor, Society of Physics Students; Topic: Electrochemical optoelectronics and biosensors; -Established temperature and length dependence of DNA electrochemistry; -ONR supported research for scalable nanomanufacturing with DNA-inspired materials; -Collaborating with Indiana University School of Medicine to use DNA electronic devices to optimize cancer therapies; -Developed the first light emitting electrochemical cells meeting the DOE lighting luminance benchmark
Assistant Professor
The University of Texas at Dallas [2010–2016]
-2014 University of Texas System Regent's Outstanding Teacher Award -2014 Texas Section American Physical Society Hyer Award (with Marc McWilliams)
Postdoctoral Scholar
California Institute of Technology [2007–2010]
Advisor: Jackie K. Barton Electrochemical protein detection with DNA-modified electrodes Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) postdoctoral fellowship Developed multiplexed and miniaturized devices for rapid protein sensing Demonstrated charge transport through 100-mer DNA
Graduate Research Assistant
Cornell University [2002–2007]
Advisor: George G. Malliaras Project: Understanding and improving light emitting devices based on ionic transition metal complexes (iTMCs) National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship
Visiting Scientist
University of Cambridge (England) [2005–2005]
Advisor: Richard H. Friend Used Raman spectroscopy to study the degradation of iTMC devices by tracking the in situ formation and spatial location of luminescence-quenching compounds.

Awards

Institutional Improvement Award - The University of Texas at Dallas [2018]
Hyer Award - American Physical Society, Texas Section [2014]
Regent's Outstanding Teaching Award - University of Texas System [2014]
Outstanding Alumni Award - Southern Nazarene University [2013]

Additional Information

Patents

Cascaded light emitting devices based on mixed conductor electroluminescence. G. G. Malliaras, K. Mori, J. D. Slinker, D. A. Bernards and H. D. Abruña. US Patent No. 7,755,275 (2010).

Cascaded light emitting devices based on mixed conductor electroluminescence. G. G. Malliaras, K. Mori, J. D. Slinker, D. A. Bernards and H. D. Abruña.  US Patent No. 8,063,566 (2011).

Electrospun light-emitting nanofibers. J. Moran-Mirabal, H. G. Craighead, G. G. Malliaras, H. D. Abruña and J. D. Slinker. US Patent No. 8,106,580 (2012).

Electrospun light-emitting fibers. J. Moran-Mirabal, H. G. Craighead, G. G. Malliaras, H. D. Abruña and J. D. Slinker. US Patent No. 8,541,940 (2013).

(Pending) High Performance Light Emitting Devices from Ionic Transition Metal Complexes. J. D. Slinker, Y. Shen and B. H. Holliday. US Patent Application No. 20140291590.

News Articles

DNA Devices For Selective, Individualized Cancer Therapy
Given the emerging landscape of DNA damaging drugs, it would be highly beneficial to develop sensors that can follow drug activity to discover patient-specific responses. To address this challenge, we propose to leverage a device to investigate the activity of drugs from patient samples to identify optimal treatments. In our work with the Boothman Lab of the Indiana University School of Medicine, we demonstrated a means to follow DNA damage responses to anticancer drug treatment in lysates of cancerous and normal cells.
Effect of the Dielectric Constant and Ion Mobility in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells
A cationic iridium complex emitter in a light-emitting electrochemical cell is used to study the competing effects on the dielectric constant by varying the size of the negative ions with it.
Tracking DNA damage with electrochemical sensing.
DNA electronic devices can distinguish various forms of DNA damage and are now being used to follow anticancer drug activity.
Lessons Learned as a Student Help Guide Physics Professor to Award
University students sometimes forget that their professors were once students themselves. For UT Dallas’ Dr. Jason Slinker, the experiences he had as a student helped guide him toward a career as a university professor.
Physicist's DNA Chip Offers Big Possibilities in Cell, Cancer Studies
A UT Dallas physicist has developed a novel technology that not only sheds light on basic cell biology, but also could aid in the development of more effective cancer treatments or early diagnosis of disease. 
Dr. Jason Slinker
, associate professor of physics, and his colleagues developed an electronic device that uses DNA molecules — the genetic material found in every human cell — and other biochemicals to simulate certain cell activity. 

Funding

DNA-INSPIRED ASSEMBLY OF NANOSCALE ELECTRONIC DEVICES
$180,000 - Office of Naval Research [2016–2019]
SNM: DNA-Directed Self Assembly of Nanoscale Integrated Circuits
$300,000 - National Science Foundation [2012–2014]
REU Site: Summer Research Program in Experimental and Theoretical Physics at The University of Texas at Dallas
$268,000 - National Science Foundation [2016/01–2020/12]