Jason Slinker

Jason Slinker

Undergraduate Program Head
Associate Professor - Physics
Mentor, Society of Physics Students
Affiliated Faculty, UTD Materials Science and Engineering & Department of Chemistry
 
972-883-6513
SCI 2.174
Slinker Group
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Tags: Physics

Professional Preparation

Ph.D. - Applied and Engineering Physics
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) - 2007
M.S. - Applied and Engineering Physics
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) - 2006
B.S. - Physics, Chemistry and Math (Triple major, GPA: 4.0)
Southern Nazarene University - 2001

Research Areas

Optoelectronics from Organic and Hybrid Mixed Conductors
Ionic and electronic conductivity are leveraged to bring about high efficiency light emitting devices and solar cells with simple, low-cost architectures.
Electrochemical Sensors of Protein and Drug Activity
Electrochemical DNA devices are used to sense anticancer drug and protein activity that disrupts the structure of the double helix.
Bioinspired Molecular Wires
Utilizing DNA-inspired molecular nanowire devices with high fidelity and reproducibility.

Publications

Single-Particle Spectroscopy as a Versatile Tool to Explore Lower-Dimensional Structures of Inorganic Perovskites 2021 - Journal Article
Leveraging a Stable Perovskite Composite to Satisfy Blue Electroluminescence Standards 2021 - Journal Article
Detecting Attomolar DNA-Damaging Anticancer Drug Activity in Cell Lysates with Electrochemical DNA Devices 2021 - Journal Article
Pure Blue Electroluminescence by Differentiated Ion Motion in a Single Layer Perovskite Device 2021 - Journal Article
Reconfigurable Perovskite LEC: Effects of Ionic Additives and Dual Function Devices 2021 - Journal Article
Bright Single-Layer Perovskite Host–Ionic Guest Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells 2021 - Journal Article
Machine Learning for Estimating Electron Transfer Rates From Square Wave Voltammetry 2021 - Journal Article
Circumventing Dedicated Electrolytes in Light‐Emitting Electrochemical Cells 2020 - Journal Article

Awards

Hyer Award - American Physical Society, Texas Section [2019]
Institutional Improvement Award - The University of Texas at Dallas [2018]
Hyer Award - American Physical Society, Texas Section [2014]
Regent's Outstanding Teaching Award - University of Texas System [2014]
Outstanding Alumni Award - Southern Nazarene University [2013]

Appointments

Associate Professor
The University of Texas at Dallas [2016–Present]
Physics Undergraduate Program Head; Affilated Faculty, Materials Science and Engineering; Mentor, UTD Society of Physics Students; Research Topic: Electrochemical optoelectronics and bioinspired electronics; 2020 International Advisory Boa;rd, ChemPlusChem; 2019 Texas Section American Physical Society Hyer Award (with Nolan King)
Assistant Professor
The University of Texas at Dallas [2010–2016]
-2014 University of Texas System Regent's Outstanding Teacher Award -2014 Texas Section American Physical Society Hyer Award (with Marc McWilliams)
Postdoctoral Scholar
California Institute of Technology [2007–2010]
Advisor: Jackie K. Barton Electrochemical protein detection with DNA-modified electrodes Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) postdoctoral fellowship
Graduate Research Assistant
Cornell University [2002–2007]
Advisor: George G. Malliaras Understanding and improving light emitting devices based on ionic transition metal complexes (iTMCs) National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship
Visiting Scientist
University of Cambridge (England) [2005–2005]
Advisor: Richard H. Friend Used Raman spectroscopy to study the degradation of iTMC devices by tracking the in situ formation and spatial location of luminescence-quenching compounds.

Additional Information

Patents

Cascaded light emitting devices based on mixed conductor electroluminescence. G. G. Malliaras, K. Mori, J. D. Slinker, D. A. Bernards and H. D. Abruña. US Patent No. 7,755,275 (2010).

Cascaded light emitting devices based on mixed conductor electroluminescence. G. G. Malliaras, K. Mori, J. D. Slinker, D. A. Bernards and H. D. Abruña.  US Patent No. 8,063,566 (2011).

Electrospun light-emitting nanofibers. J. Moran-Mirabal, H. G. Craighead, G. G. Malliaras, H. D. Abruña and J. D. Slinker. US Patent No. 8,106,580 (2012).

Electrospun light-emitting fibers. J. Moran-Mirabal, H. G. Craighead, G. G. Malliaras, H. D. Abruña and J. D. Slinker. US Patent No. 8,541,940 (2013).

(Pending) High Performance Light Emitting Devices from Ionic Transition Metal Complexes. J. D. Slinker, Y. Shen and B. H. Holliday. US Patent Application No. 20140291590.

News Articles

Leveraging a Stable Perovskite Composite to Satisfy Blue Electroluminescence Standards
Leveraging a Stable Perovskite Composite to Satisfy Blue Electroluminescence Standards Differential ion motion in mixed halide blue perovskite light-emitting electrochemical cells is produced with a LiPF6 salt additive, which dissociates to form electrical double layers at the electrodes and preserves the underlying perovskite structure. This combination, together with supporting electrolyte polymers, produced stable pure blue electroluminescence surpassing standard benchmarks. The background shows an edge glow rendering of the atomic force microscopy image of a blended thin film used in this study.
Pure Blue Electroluminescence: Pure Blue Electroluminescence by Differentiated Ion Motion in a Single Layer Perovskite Device
Pure Blue Electroluminescence: Pure Blue Electroluminescence by Differentiated Ion Motion in a Single Layer Perovskite Device In article number 2102006, Jason D. Slinker and co-workers leverage CsPbBr3−xClx perovskites, polyelectrolytes, and a salt additive to demonstrate pure blue emission from single-layer light-emitting electrochemical cells. The electrolytes transport the ions from salt additives, enhancing charge injection and stabilizing the inherent perovskite emissive lattice for highly pure and sustained blue emission. The resulting pure blue emission meets the US NTSC blue standard benchmark.
Bright Single-Layer Perovskite Host–Ionic Guest Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells
Bright Single-Layer Perovskite Host–Ionic Guest Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells To achieve high performance in a simple single-layer device, a CsPbBr3 perovskite host and a novel ionic iridium complex guest were utilized along with a polyelectrolyte to demonstrate efficient light-emitting electrochemical cells. Perovskites are excellent solution-processable conductive materials, and iridium complexes continue to be of great interest as highly luminophoric materials. In light-emitting electrochemical cells, the application of a bias induces ionic redistribution that facilitates electron and hole injection and subsequent light emission.
Perovskite Light‐Emitting Electrochemical Cells: Enhanced Operational Stability of Perovskite Light‐Emitting Electrochemical Cells Leveraging Ionic Additives
Perovskite Light‐Emitting Electrochemical Cells: Enhanced Operational Stability of Perovskite Light‐Emitting Electrochemical Cells Leveraging Ionic Additives Perovskite light‐emitting electrochemical cells (PeLECs) utilize ionic redistribution to emit light efficiently from single layer devices. As demonstrated by Jason D. Slinker and co‐workers in article number 2000226, PeLECs show 100 h operation in excess of 800 cd m−2 and extrapolated lifetimes of 6700 h at 100 cd m−2 with an optimal concentration of a lithium salt additive. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals lithium additives enhance efficiency through improved electrical double layer formation.
Bright and Effectual Perovskite Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells Leveraging Ionic Additives
Bright and Effectual Perovskite Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells Leveraging Ionic Additives We leveraged a poly(ethylene oxide) electrolyte and a lithium salt in CsPbBr3 thin films to produce ~15000 cd/m2 performance in perovskite light-emitting electrochemical cells. We find that lithium salt addition reduces the occurrence of voids, charge traps, and pinholes and increases grain size and packing density. View the article.

Funding

High Precision Electrical Characterization of Bioinspired Nanowire Devices
$122,384 - Office of Naval Research [2020/02–2021/01]
Leveraging a Solvent Toolkit for Doping and Characterizing Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells
200,000 - National Science Foundation [2019/06–2022/05]
DNA-INSPIRED ASSEMBLY OF NANOSCALE ELECTRONIC DEVICES
$180,000 - Office of Naval Research [2016/08–2020/07]
REU Site: Summer Research Program in Experimental and Theoretical Physics at The University of Texas at Dallas
$268,000 - National Science Foundation [2016/01–2020/12]
SNM: DNA-Directed Self Assembly of Nanoscale Integrated Circuits
$300,000 - National Science Foundation [2012/01–2015/06]