Kevin Hamlen

Professor - Computer Science
Tags: Security Computer Science

Professional Preparation

Ph.D. - Computer Science
Cornell University - 2006
MS - Computer Science
Cornell University - 2002
BS - Computer Science
Carnegie Mellon University - 1998
BS - Mathematical Sciences
Carnegie Mellon University - 1998

Research Areas

Thesis Research

Security Policy Enforcement by Program-Rewriting

PhD Dissertation
Computer Science Department, Cornell University
Fall 2000 - August 2006
Advisors: Dr. Greg Morrisett, Dr. Fred Schneider, Dr. Shimon Edelman

Proof-Carrying Code for x86 Architectures

Senior Honors Thesis
School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University
Fall 1997 - Spring 1998
Advisor: Dr. Peter Lee

Publications

Safwan M. Khan and Kevin W. Hamlen. Hatman: Intra-cloud Trust Management for Hadoop. In Proceedings of the 5th IEEE International Conference on Cloud Computing (CLOUD), June 2012. [BibTeX] 2012 - Publication
Kevin W. Hamlen, Micah M. Jones, and Meera Sridhar. Aspect-oriented Runtime Monitor Certification. In Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Tools and Algorithms for the Construction and Analysis of Systems (TACAS), pp. 126-140, March-April 2012. [BibTeX] [acceptance rate: 24%] 2012 - Publication
Safwan M. Khan and Kevin W. Hamlen. AnonymousCloud: A Data Ownership Privacy Provider Framework in Cloud Computing. In Proceedings of the 11th IEEE International Conference on Trust, Security and Privacy in Computing and Communications (TrustCom), June 2012. [BibTeX] [acceptance rate: <30%] 2012 - Publication
Kevin W. Hamlen and William Hamlen. An Economic Perspective of Message-dropping Attacks in Peer-to-peer Overlays. Intelligence and Security Informatics (ISI), 1:6, March 2012. [BibTeX] 2012 - Publication
Micah Jones and Kevin W. Hamlen. A Service-oriented Approach to Mobile Code Security. In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Mobile Web Information Systems (MobiWIS), pp. 531-538, September 2011. [BibTeX] [acceptance rate: 36%] 2011 - Publication
Meera Sridhar and Kevin W. Hamlen. Flexible In-lined Reference Monitor Certification: Challenges and Future Directions. In Proceedings of the 5th ACM SIGPLAN Workshop on Programming Languages meets Program Verification (PLPV), pp. 55-60, January 2011. [BibTeX] [acceptance rate: 60%] 2011 - Publication
Pallabi Parveen, Jonathan Evans, Bhavani Thuraisingham, Kevin W. Hamlen, and Latifur Khan. Insider Threat Detection using Stream Mining and Graph Mining. In Proceedings of the 3rd IEEE Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust (PASSAT), pp. 1102-1110, October 2011. [BibTeX] [acceptance rate: 8%] 2011 - Publication
Pallabi Parveen, Zackary R. Weger, Bhavani Thuraisingham, Kevin W. Hamlen, and Latifur Khan. Supervised Learning for Insider Threat Detection Using Stream Mining. In Proceedings of the 23rd IEEE International Conference on Tools with Artificial Intelligence (ICTAI), pp. 1032-1039, November 2011. (Best Paper Award) [BibTeX] [acceptance rate: 30%] 2011 - Publication
Kevin W. Hamlen and Bhavani Thuraisingham. Secure Semantic Computing. International Journal of Semantic Computing (IJSC), 5(2):121-131, June 2011. [BibTeX] 2011 - Publication
Mohammad Mehedy Masud, Clay Woolam, Jing Gao, Latifur Khan, Jiawei Han, Kevin W. Hamlen, and Nikunj C. Oza. Facing the Reality of Data Stream Classification: Coping with Scarcity of Labeled Data. Knowledge and Information Systems (KAIS), 1-32, November 2011. [BibTeX] [impact factor: 2.008] 2011 - Publication

Appointments

Associate Professor
The University of Texas at Dallas [2012–Present]
Assistant Professor
The University of Texas at Dallas [2006–2012]
Research Intern
Microsoft Research, Cambridge [2002–2002]
Technical Consultant
Microsoft Research, Redmond [2001–2001]
Research and Teaching Assistant
Cornell University [1998–2006]

Additional Information

Professional Memberships
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2010–present
  • Association of Computing Machinery (ACM), 2008–present
Honors and Awards
  • NYU-Poly CSAW Best Applied Security Paper of the Year award, 2nd place, 2014.
  • Metroplex Technology Business Council Tech Titan Technology Inventor, Finalist (final four), 2013.
  • Outstanding Teaching Award, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Texas at Dallas, 2013.
  • Best Student Paper Award, Annual Computer Security Applications Conference (ACSAC), 2012.
  • NYU-Poly AT&T Best Applied Security Paper of the Year award, 2nd place, 2012.
  • Faculty Research Award, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Texas at Dallas, 2012.
  • Best Paper Award, IEEE International Conference on Tools with Artificial Intelligence (ICTAI), Special Session on Stream Data Mining, 2011.
  • CAREER Award, National Science Foundation, 2011.
  • Air Force Young Investigator Program Program (Career) Award, 2008.
  • Allen Newell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Research, CMU, 1998.
  • Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society, Carnegie Mellon University, 1998.
  • Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society, Carnegie Mellon University, 1998.

News Articles

Frankenstein Programmers Test a Cybersecurity Monster
To catch a thief, you have to think like one. UT Dallas computer scientists are trying to stay one step ahead of cyberattackers by creating their own monster. Their monster, called "Frankenstein", can cloak itself by creating malicious software entirely from the standard programs already found on victim computers. The work is the invention of computer science doctoral student Vishwath Mohan and his supervisor Dr. Kevin Hamlen. Just as Mary Shelley's Victor Frankenstein stitched together the body parts of ordinary individuals to create a monster, Mohan and Hamlen's Frankenstein can automatically create viruses by stitching together pieces of benign programs. "Shelley's story is an example of a horror that can result from science, and similarly, we intend our creation as a warning that we need better detections for these types of intrusions," said Dr. Hamlen, associate professor of computer science at UT Dallas. Hamlen said Frankenstein could be used to aid government counter terrorism efforts by providing cover for infiltration of terrorist computer networks. The UT Dallas research is the first published example describing this type of stealth technology. Hamlen is part of the Cyber Security Research and Education Center in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.
Cybersecurity Researchers Roll Out A New Heartbleed Solution
As companies scrambled in recent days to address the latest cybersecurity bug known as Heartbleed, researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas had a solution that fixes the vulnerability, and also detects and entraps hackers who might be using it to steal sensitive data.
The advanced technique — dubbed Red Herring — was created by a team led by Dr. Kevin Hamlen, an associate professor of computer science in the Erik Jonsson School of Computer Science and Engineering. It automates the process of creating decoy servers, making hackers believe they have gained access to confidential, secure information, when in fact their deeds are being monitored, analyzed and traced back to the source.
Cybersecurity Researchers Roll Out A New Heartbleed Solution
As companies scrambled in recent days to address the latest cybersecurity bug known as Heartbleed, researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas had a solution that fixes the vulnerability, and also detects and entraps hackers who might be using it to steal sensitive data.
The advanced technique — dubbed Red Herring — was created by a team led by Dr. Kevin Hamlen, an associate professor of computer science in the Erik Jonsson School of Computer Science and Engineering. It automates the process of creating decoy servers, making hackers believe they have gained access to confidential, secure information, when in fact their deeds are being monitored, analyzed and traced back to the source.
Latest Computer Threat Could Be Worst Yet
The next looming threat to your computer is more insidious than anything experts have seen in the past, says a UT Dallas computer scientist.

Dr. Kevin Hamlen is referring to a form of malicious software, or malware, that he calls “reactively adaptive.” And although the threat is still hypothetical, he and his colleagues caution that unless adequate defenses are developed soon, reactively adaptive malware could one day roam the Internet with impunity, producing potentially disastrous consequences.
Latest Computer Threat Could Be Worst Yet
The next looming threat to your computer is more insidious than anything experts have seen in the past, says a UT Dallas computer scientist.

Dr. Kevin Hamlen is referring to a form of malicious software, or malware, that he calls “reactively adaptive.” And although the threat is still hypothetical, he and his colleagues caution that unless adequate defenses are developed soon, reactively adaptive malware could one day roam the Internet with impunity, producing potentially disastrous consequences.