John Geissman

Professor and Program Head - Geosciences
geissman@utdallas.edu
972-883-2403
ROC2301G
ORCID
Tags: Geoscience

Professional Preparation

Ph.D. - Geological Sciences
University of Michigan-Ann Arbor - 1980
M.S. - Geological Sciences
University of Michigan-Ann Arbor - 1976
B.S. - Geology
University of Michigan-Ann Arbor - 1973

Research Areas

Research and Teaching Interests

Over the past decade, while on the faculty at the University of New Mexico, I have taught field geology, structural geology, tectonics, exploration geophysics, geology of New Mexico, solid earth geophysics, paleomagnetism, scientific presentations, Earth history, and physical geology. Notably, working with a colleague at the University of New Mexico, I have developed and refined the field geology course into an outstanding and also demanding/rigorous field geology experience.  I also participate in the instruction of the University of Michigan’s summer field geology course.

My research interests include the structural evolution of highly extended parts of the Basin and Range Province in the western US, Triassic paleomagnetism and magnetostratigraphy and its bearing on Colorado Plateau rotation, Pennsylvanian/ Permian redbeds along the eastern and northern margin of the Colorado Plateau, deformation along the eastern margin of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis in Southeast Asia, Precambrian paleomagnetism in the western US, pseudotachylite formation, the emplacement of shallow level igneous bodies (e.g., laccoliths and regionally extensive sill complexes), and developing improved techniques to recognize subtle yet significant differences among populations of magnetized phases in rocks whose magnetic mineralogy is dominated by magnetite and/or maghemite.

Publications

Connell, S.D., Smith, G.A., Geissman, J., and McIntosh, W., 2011, Tectonic and limatic controls on Upper Cenozoic nonmarine depositional sequences, Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande rift, north-central New Mexico, in Hudson, M.R., and Grauch, T., ed., New Perspectives on the Rio Grande Rift: From Tectonics to Groundwater, Boulder, Geological Society of America Special Paper, in press. 2011 - Publication
Zeigler, K.E., and Geissman, J.W., 2011, Magnetostratigraphic Compilation for the Upper Triassic Chinle Group of New Mexico: Implications for regional and global correlations: Geosphere, Geological Society of America, in press. 2011 - Publication
ucas, S. G., L. H. Tanner, et al. (2011). "Position of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and timing of the end-Triassic extinctions on land: Data from the Moenave Formation on the southern Colorado Plateau, USA." Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 302: 194-205. 2011 - Publication
Godinez-Urban, A., R. S. Molina-Garza, et al. (2011). "Paleomagnetism of the Todos Santos and La Silla Formations, Chiapas: Implications for the Opening of the Gulf of Mexico." Geosphere 7: 145-158. 2011 - Publication
Geissman, J. W., Holm, D. K., Harlan, S. S., and Embree, G., 2010, Paleomagnetic evidence for rapid, high temperature formation of large-scale rheomorphic structures in the upper Pliocene Huckleberry Ridge Tuff, east-central Idaho: Geology, v. 38, p. 263-266. 2010 - Publication
Naibert, T. J., Geissman, J. W., and Heizler, M., 2010, Magnetic fabric, paleomagnetic, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic data bearing on the emplacement of the Philipsburg Batholith, southwest Montana fold/thrust belt: Lithosphere, v. 2, p. 303-327. 2010 - Publication
Oliva-Urcia, B., Casas, A. M., Pueyo, E. L., Roman-Berdiel, T., and Geissman, J. W., 2010, Paleomagnetic evidence for dextral strike-slip motion in the Pyrenees during Alpine convergence: Tectonophysics, v. 494, p. 165-179. 2010 - Publication
Godinez-Urban, A., Molina-Garza, R. S., Geissman, J. W., and Wawrzyniec, T. F., 2010, Paleomagnetism of the Todos Santos and La Silla Formations, Chiapas: Implications for the Opening of the Gulf of Mexico, in Lawton, T. F., ed., Geosphere Special Issue, in press. 2010 - Publication
Lucas, S.G., Kozur, H., Donohoo-Hurley, L., Geissman, J.W., Weems, R.E., 2010, Timing of the end-Triassic extinctions on land: The Moenave Formation on the southern Colorado Plateau, USA, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, in press. 2010 - Publication
Donohoo- Hurley, L. L., Geissman, J. W., and Lucas, S. G., 2010, Magnetostratigraphy of the uppermost Triassic and lowest Jurassic Moenave Formation western United States: Correlation with strata in the United Kingdom, Morocco, Turkey, Italy, and eastern United States: Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, v. 122, p. 2005-2019. 2010 - Publication

Appointments

Vice President
Geological Society of America [2010–Present]
Professor of Geosciences
University of Texas at Dallas [2010–Present]
Chair
University of New Mexico [2007–2010]
Council Member
Geological Society of America [2005–Present]
Chair
University of New Mexico on Gevernance [2005–2007]
Crosby Professor
Massachusetts Institute of Technology [2004–2018]
Science Editor, Eos
American Geophysical Union [2003–2010]
Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism Editor, Eos
American Geophysical Union [2001–2003]
Science Editor, Eos
American Geophysical Union [1999–2002]
Adjunct Full Professor
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor [1997–Present]

Awards

Distinguished Service Award - Geological Society of America [2002]
Fellow - American Geophysical Union

Additional Information

Works in progress
 Ferre, E. C., Geissman, J. W., Zechmeister, M. S., and Hill, M. J., 2010, Coseismic and postseismic magnetization in pseudotachylytes: Example from the Eastern Peninsular Ranges, California: Journal of Geophysical Research, v. in review.
 
      Geissman, J. W., Burchfiel, B. C., Studnicki-Gizbert, C., Akciz, S., Lianzhong, C., and Brocklehurst, S., , Complexities in the early Cenozoic extrusion of crustal fragments around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis: Geosphere, Electronic Journal of the Geological Society of America, in final prep.
 
      Geissman, J.W., Three component thermal demagnetization of anhysteretic remenant magnetization (ARM)—a new technique to evaluate differences in grain size distributions in magnetite/maghemite dominated geologic materials.
       Geissman, J.W., Wawrzyniec, T.F., Petronis, M.S., and Lundahl, A., 2009, Paleomagnetic data bearing on localized deformation along the margin of the Albuquerque/Belen Basin: Results from the Permian Abo and Yeso Formation and a mid-Tertiary intrusion, Placitas area, Sandia Mountains, and Lower Permian Abo Formation, Carizzo Arroyo, Lucero uplift, New Mexico, in final prep.
 
      Muggleton, S. and J. W. Geissman, 2006, Paleomagnetism of the Spanish Peaks igneous complex and related intrusions, south-central Colorado: refining the mid-Cenozoic geomagnetic field of North America." Journal of Geophysical Research, in final prep.
 
      Grow, J.S., Geissman, J.W., Oldow, J.S., and Stockli, D.F., 2010, New paleomagnetic data bearing on the Neogene evolution of the Walker Lane belt transfer zone, west-central Nevada, in final prep.
 
     Callahan, C.N., Geissman, J.W., Selverstone, J., and Brearley, A.J., 2010, Magnetic property evidence for local heterogeneity in mantle oxidation state, mantle xenoliths from the Rio Puerco volcanic necks, central New Mexico.
 
      DePaolo, D.J., Geissman, J.W., Perry, F. V., McFadden, L.D., Wells, S.G., Crowe, B.M., and others?  “Lathrop Wells volcanic center: geology, geomorphology, and paleomagnetism” (title approximate).
 
      Snow, J.K., J.W. Geissman, and B.P. Wernicke Age and paleomagnetism of contractile structures in the Cottonwood Mountains, Death Valley area, southeast California.
 
      Geissman, J.W., Harlan, S.S., Feig, A.D.,Paleomagnetism of the Mesoproterozoic Pikes Peak batholith, southern Front Range, Colorado.
 
     Geissman, J.W., On the paleomagnetic signature of crystalline crust in extensional terranes.
     
     Geissman, J.W., and Harlan, S.S., Paleomagnetic data from the Hoover Dam area document approximately 45 degrees of counterclockwise rotation related to slip along the Lake Mead Fault System.
     
 
     Geissman, J.W., Applications of Paleomagnetism in the Basin and Range province, western U.S.A., and relevance to models for crustal extension. 
        
     Geissman, J.W., Keating, G., F.V. Perry, B.M. Crowe, and P. Zeitler Paleomagnetism and rock magnetism of late Miocene intrusions, Paiute Ridge, Nevada.
     
     Geissman, J.W., Partial late Paleozoic remagnetization of the Cambro-Ordovician Ignacio Formation, southwest San Juan Mountains, Colorado.
     
     J.W. Geissman, G.A. Acton, and M. Schneider, aleomagnetism of mafic dikes in the Roberts Mountains and Cortez Range, Nevada: Implications for structural history of the northern Nevada rift.
          
     J.W. Geissman, J.C., Eichelberger, S.S. Harlan, and C. McCabe,  The rock magnetic record of silicic magma emplacement, Obidian Domes, California.

News Articles

Prof Selected to Lead Geological Society of America
Dr. John Geissman, professor in the UT Dallas Department of Geosciences, has been named president of the Geological Society of America. He began his one-year term July 1. Geissman joined UT Dallas last year. His research interests include paleomagnetism and tectonics. “The opportunity for constructive cooperation among all professional geoscience organizations has never been greater,” Geissman said of his appointment. “GSA must continue to play a vibrant role in this mission, by first and foremost fostering a strong, energetic, and visible professional organization for its members and translating our importance to society.” He will address the GSA annual meeting in Minneapolis, Minn., this fall. The organization, established in 1888, encourages earth scientists to share their findings about the study of the planet.
Findings Rock Long-Held Assumptions about Ancient Mass Extinction
New evidence gathered from the Karoo Basin in South Africa sheds light on a catastrophic extinction event that occurred more than 250 million years ago and wiped out more than 90 percent of life in Earth’s oceans and about 70 percent of animal species on land.

In research to be presented Wednesday at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America and published in the October issue of the journal Geology, a University of Texas at Dallas geologist and his colleagues describe new findings that challenge the currently accepted model of the “Great Dying” and how it affected land animals. That event occurred at the end of the Permian geologic period. 
Findings Rock Long-Held Assumptions about Ancient Mass Extinction
New evidence gathered from the Karoo Basin in South Africa sheds light on a catastrophic extinction event that occurred more than 250 million years ago and wiped out more than 90 percent of life in Earth’s oceans and about 70 percent of animal species on land.

In research to be presented Wednesday at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America and published in the October issue of the journal Geology, a University of Texas at Dallas geologist and his colleagues describe new findings that challenge the currently accepted model of the “Great Dying” and how it affected land animals. That event occurred at the end of the Permian geologic period.