Fatemeh Hassanipour

Associate Professor - Mechanical Engineering
Tags: Mechanical Engineering

Professional Preparation

Ph.D. - Mechanical Engineering
Southern Methodist University - 2009
B.S. - Mechanical Engineering
University of Tehran - 1998

Research Areas

Research Interests

Heat transfer and Fluid mechanics with applications in energy conservation, storage, and management, health and bioengineering (modeling and simulation of biomechanical systems), and electronic cooling. My research investigations include, but are not limited to, methods involving particulate flow, phase change materials and porous media.

Publications

L. Small and F. Hassanipour Bio-Inspired Segmented Flow: Effect of Particle Elongation on the Heat Transfer, ASME Journal of Heat Transfer, Volume(135) Issue(7), pp 071001-071007, 2013. 2013 - Publication
F. Hassanipour, I. Perez-Raya, N. Mortazavi, Simulation of Vortex Ring Permeation in Porous Media,'' Journal of Porous Media, Volume (16) Issue (7), pp 597-605, 2013. 2013 - Publication
N. Mortazavi and F. Hassanipour, “Effect of Inertia and Viscosity Force on Heat Transfer in Triangular Porous Channels,'' ITherm Conference, May 2012, San Diego, CA. 2012 - Publication
N. Mortazavi and F. Hassanipour, Effect of Apex Angle on the Flow and Heat Transfer in Triangular Porous Ducts with Iso-flux Boundary Conditions ,'' ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, November 2011, Denver, CO. 2012 - Publication
L. Small and F. Hassanipour Bio-Inspired Segmented Flow: Effect of Particle Elongation on the Heat Transfer, accepted for publication in ASME Journal of Heat Transfer, 2012. 2012 - Publication
N. Mortazavi and F. Hassanipour, Heat Transfer in Iso-Thermal Triangular Channel Filled with Porous Media, The 10th International Conference on Nanochannels, Microchannels, and Minichannels, July 2012, Puerto Rico, USA. 2012 - Publication
A.H. Fultz and F. Hassanipour, Analysis of Vortex Flow Through Porous Media, 4th International Conference on Porous Media and its Applications in Science, Engineering and Industry, June 2012, Potsdam, Germany. 2012 - Publication
N. Omidvar and F. Hassanipour, Experimental Analysis of Nanofluid slurry through Rectangular Porous Channel, ASME 2012 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, November 2012, Houston, TX. 2012 - Publication
N. Omidvar and F. Hassanipour, Experimental Analysis of Phase Change Material Slurry through Porous Channel,'' ITherm Conference, May 2012, San Diego, CA. 2012 - Publication
K. Fathian , F. Hassanipour, and N. Gans Virtual Thermal Sensing and Control of Heat Distribution using State Estimation,'' ASME 2012 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, November 2012, Houston, TX. 2012 - Publication

Additional Information

Honors and Awards
  • Faculty Diversity Award, UTDallas, 2011
  • Young Engineer of the Year, ASME North Texas Section, 2010
  • Oak Ridge Associated Universities Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Award, 2010
  • ASHRAE Peanut Vinther Award, 2005
  • Best Research Award, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 2008
  • ASME North Texas Section Student Award, 2008
  • Best Graduate Student Award, Dept. Mechanical Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 2008
  • GAANN Fellowship, 2008

News Articles

Professor Named Young Engineer of the Year
Taking a cue from the lungs of mammals, Dr. Fatemeh Hassanipour is exploring a new cooling concept that could have applications in airplanes, data centers and elsewhere. Her novel concept is inspired by the gas exchange process in pulmonary capillaries, where red blood cells flow with blood plasma, yielding very high gas transfer efficiency. In her approach, special encapsulated particles flowing in water transfer the heat out of a system. Her innovative work is just one of the reasons she’s been named Young Engineer of the Year by the North Texas section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
Engineering Professor to Unlock Science Behind Motherhood
While the topic of fluid dynamics has always interested Dr. Fatemeh Hassanipour, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at UT Dallas, motherhood brought women’s health issues to the forefront: Specifically, she became curious about the mechanics of breastfeeding.
Now, that curiosity has landed her a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award, which provides $500,000 in funding over five years for her research.
Provost’s Award for Faculty Excellence in Undergraduate Research Mentoring
Dr. Fatemeh Hassanipour
associate professor of mechanical engineering
Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science


What has been the most rewarding part of your teaching experience here?

“The opportunity to influence the future generation and to equip them with the knowledge that enables them to make a difference. It has been wonderful to be involved with successive generations of students, watching their knowledge and self-confidence deepen, witnessing their graduations and hearing back from them — sometimes years after graduation.”


What advice would you give to aspiring student researchers?

“Believe in yourself; work hard; don’t give up; be kind; and give back to your community and society.”
Thermal Imaging Enhances Engineers’ Understanding of Breast Tumors
Thermal imaging has been available for decades to detect temperature differences on the skin that could signal breast cancer without exposing patients to radiation, although the method is not as reliable as mammography.

New research performed at The University of Texas at Dallas and published June 22 in Nature Research’s Scientific Reports takes a critical step toward making digital infrared thermal imaging more useful for monitoring breast cancer.

Engineers in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, working with radiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center, recruited 11 female patients who volunteered for the study through UT Southwestern and Parkland Health & Hospital System in Dallas. The team used a high-resolution infrared camera, clinical data from patient volunteers, 3D scanning and computer-aided design to build a proof-of-concept computer model of the thermal properties of breast cancer.