Aage Moller

Founders Professor
Professor - Behavioral and Brain Sciences
amoller@utdallas.edu
972-883-4306
BSB14601
Faculty Page
Tags: Cognition and Neuroscience

Professional Preparation

Ph.D. - Medicine
Karolinska Institute - 1975
Cand. Med. - Medicine
Karolinska Institute - 1974
Docent - Physiological
Karolinska Institute - 1965

Research Areas

Research Interests

I am particularly interested in neural plasticity and its role in tinnitus, hyperacusis, phonophobia and misophonia.

Publications

Moller, A.R. The role of auditory deprivation. In: Moller, A.R., Langguth, B., De Ridder, D. and Kleinjung, T. (Eds.) Textbook of Tinnitus, Springer, New York, Chapter 11, pp. 95-98, 2010. 2010 - Publication
De Ridder, D. and Moller, A.R. Similarities Between Treatments of Tinnitus and Central Pain In: Moller, A.R., Langguth, B., De Ridder, D. and Kleinjung, T. (Eds.) Textbook of Tinnitus, Springer, New York, Chapter 94, pp. 753-761, 2010. 2010 - Publication
Moller, A.R. Plasticity diseases. Neurol. Res. 31(10):1023-30, 2009. 2009 - Publication
Moller, A.R. Osburn, L. L., Cohen-Gadol. Hemilingual Spasm: Pathophysiology. Neurosci. Lett. 461:76-9, 2009. 2009 - Publication
Goble TJ, AR Moller and LT Thompson (2009) Acute high-intensity sound exposure alters responses of place cells in hippocampus. Hear Res 253:52-9. 2009 - Publication
Langguth, B., de Ridder, D., Dornhoffer, J.L., Eichhammer, P., Folmer, R.L., Frank, E., Fregni, F., Gerloff, C., Khedr, E., Kleinjung, T., Landgrebe, M., Lee, S., Lefaucheur, J.-P., Londero, A., Marcondes, R., Moller, A.R., Pascual-Leone, A., Plewnia, C., Rossi, S., Sanchez, T., Sand, P., Schlee, W., Steffens, T., van de Heyning, P., Hajak, G. Controversy: Does repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation/ transcranial direct current stimulation show efficacy in treating tinnitus patients? Brain Stimulation, 2008, 1, 192-205. 2008 - Publication
Moller, A.R. Neurophysiology during microvascular facial nerve compression. In: Nuwer, M.R. Ed. Handbook of Clinical Neurophysiology, vol 8, Elsevier 2008 p547-555. 2008 - Publication
Moller, A.R. Book Review: Otoacoustic Emissions: Clinical Applications. Otol. Neurotol. 2008, 29, 1049. 2008 - Publication
Moller, A.R. Neural Plasticity: For Good and Bad. Progress of Theoretical Physics Supplement No 173, 2008, p 48-65. 2008 - Publication
Moller, A.R. Neurophysiologic abnormalities in autism, In: Mesmere, B.S., ed. New Autism Research Developments. Nova Science Publishers. New York, 2007. Chapter 4, p 137-158. 2007 - Publication

Appointments

Member of the Board
American Society of Neurophysiologic Monitoring [2002–2003]
Chairman
The University of Texas at Dallas [2002–Present]
Chairman of the Board
American Society of Neurophysiologic Monitoring [1999–2002]
Professor/Holder of the Margaret Fonde Jonsson Chair
The University of Texas at Dallas [1997–Present]
Member
Special Sensory Committee on Auditory Electrophysiology, Subcommittee American Neurotology Society [1996–Present]
Vice-Chairman of the Board
American Society of Neurophysiologic Monitoring [1995–1999]
President
American Society of Neurophysiologic Monitoring [1990–1991]
President-Elect
American Society of Neurophysiologic Monitoring [1989–1990]
Professor (Tenured)
University of Pittsburgh [1988–1997]
Member of the Associate Medical Staff
Presbyterian-University Hosp. [1988–1997]

Additional Information

Ben Franklin Foundation Grant Reviewing
  • Member of the Grant Review Committee for 1992/1993, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
  • Reviewer for the Annual Proposal Selection Process of the Western Pennsylvania Advanced Technology Center's Case Studies in Economic Development, sponsored by the Ben Franklin Partnership of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1994.
Veterans Health Services and Research Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs, Grant Reviewing
  • External reviewer for the merit review of a grant application entitled, Simultaneous Ipsilateral and Contralateral Acoustic-Reflex Measures (Principal Investigator: Dr. Richard H. Wilson), August 25, 1990.
Miscellaneous Grant Reviewing
  • External reviewer for a research grant application entitled, Intensity Effects in the Auditory and Tactile Systems (Principal Investigator: Ronald T. Verrillo), Syracuse University, Institute for Sensory Research, Syracuse, New York, February 14, 1994.
  • External reviewer for a research grant application entitled, A Neuroanatomical, Electrophysiological, and Psychophysical Investigation of Trigeminal Neuralgia Treated by Microvascular Decompression (Principal Investigator: Dr. Ian MacKenzie), The Wellcome Trust, London, United Kingdom, March 15, 1993.

News Articles

Teaching Award Honors Neuroscience Researcher
Dr. Aage Møller of the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences is known around the world for his innovative research on sensory systems and neural plasticity. But back at UT Dallas, he’s known to many students simply as a terrific teacher. Møller received the President’s Teaching Excellence Award for Tenure-Track Faculty during the annual Honors Convocation on May 13. He was selected from among more than 100 eligible faculty members who were nominated by undergraduate students. The award carries a stipend of $5,000. Møller holds the Margaret Fonde Jonsson Endowed Chair in BBS. He and his wife, Margareta, also are donors to UT Dallas, helping establish scholarships and professorships at the school. Møller said he enjoys working with students and is pleased that his time in the classroom and labs helps move their education forward.
Professors Gift Establishes New Teaching Award
Dr. Aage Moller, recipient of a long list of awards throughout the world during his academic career, is demonstrating his devotion to UT Dallas students and the art of teaching through a new fund in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences (BBS). Moller holds the Margaret Fonde Jonsson Chair in BBS. He and his late wife, Margareta, frequently supported UT Dallas and previously established scholarships and professorships at the school. This most recent donation, a $30,000 endowment to establish the Aage Moller Teaching Award, was prompted by his desire to spotlight faculty members who show exceptional commitment to their students. “I think good teaching should be rewarded, and I hope a prize will promote good teaching,” he said. “In a competitive world, knowledge and skill have become increasingly important, not only to get a job that can give a paycheck and pay for necessities. But more important, knowledge and skill are essential for getting an interesting job.”
Professor Hopes Donations Inspire Further Giving
University of Texas at Dallas faculty and students will benefit from a professor’s generosity. UT Dallas Behavioral and Brain Sciences Professor Aage Moller and his wife, Margareta, are giving the University two separate gifts to endow a new professorship and a new scholarship. The first, a $100,000 gift, will fund the Aage and Margareta Moller Endowed Professorship. It will be used to support the research and scholarly activities of a tenured faculty member in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. Dr. Alice O’Toole has been selected to serve as the first Aage and Margareta Moller Endowed Professor. Her current research compares human performance on face-recognition tests to face-recognition algorithms and other biometrics.
Lecture to Focus on How Brain Changes Through Experience
Dr. Aage Møller is in high demand at scientific symposia around the world for his insights on neuroplasticity and how the brain changes through experience. When he presents UT Dallas’ annual Polykarp Kusch Lecture later this week, Møller will explain what this research means to the rest of us and how greater understanding of brain connections could lead to exciting new treatments for disabling neurological conditions. Møller, Margaret Fonde Jonsson Professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, will present “The Malleable Brain, For Good and for Bad” at 1:30 p.m. on April 27 in the McDermott Library Auditorium (MC2.410). The lecture is free and open to the public. “It was only a few years ago that it became known that changes in the connections between different cells and different parts of the brain are common,” Møller said. “One cause of changes in connections is diseases such as severe pain and tinnitus (ringing in the ears). Connections also change without any known cause, in particular in the beginning and toward the end of life.”

Funding

Tinnitus and Neurona Plasticity in the Ascending Auditory Pathway: Studies in the Rat of the Electrophysiological, Metabolic, and Molecular Manifestations of Factors Known to Induce Tinnitus in Humans
$59,517 - American Tinnitus Association [1996–2018]
Tinnitus and Neuronal Plasticity in the Ascending Auditory Pathway: Studies in the Rat of the Electrophysiological, Metabolic, and Molecular Manifestations of Factors Known to Induce Tinnitus in Humans
$59,000 - American Tinnitus Association [1995–2018]
Is Presynaptic Modulation of Neurotransmitter Release a Mechanism of Neuronal Plasticity in the Ascending Auditory Pathway?: An In Vivo Microdialysis Study in the Inferior Colliculus of the Rat
$16,000 - Copeland Foundation [1995–2018]
The Pathophysiology of Tinnitus
$15,00 - American Tinnitus Association [1994–2018]
The Pathophysiology of Tinnitus
$10,068 - American Tinnitus Association [1993–2018]